Previous Grant Recipients

1998-1999 Paul Utz, M.D. Harvard Medical School Grant funds were used to study cell death’s role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Dr. Utz focused on the mechanism of how proteins released from dying self-cells can be modified, then stimulate the patient’s immune system. ...

1998-1999 Susan Kovats, Ph.D. Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope Grant funds were used to study the nature of self-antigens in rheumatoid arthritis. This study focused on whether tissue damage or infection confuses the recognition mechanism of the immune system, causing attack on self-tissues. ...

1998-1999 Elizabeth Mellins, M.D. Stanford University Medical Center Stanford, CAGrant funds were used to study the genetics of rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Mellins examined if inherited genetic alterations in the recognition mechanism of the immune system are defective and cause RA patients to identify certain self-antigens as...

1999-2000 Ae-Kyung Yi, Ph.D. University of Iowa Many autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) and some types of arthritis, are thought to be triggered by bacterial or viral infection. Bacterial DNA can be found in the blood and synovial (joint) fluid of...

1999-2000 Edward Treadwell, M.D. East Carolina University School of Medicine Dr. Treadwell's study concentrated on understanding how specific chemical compounds existing in pristane, which is found in mineral oil and used for many food preparations, may cause systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus). Lupus is an...

1999-2000 Dean Richardson, DVM University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine Injury and/or arthritis causes damage to cartilage in joints. Cartilage is a highly differentiated and specialized cell type that has almost no capacity for healing or replacing itself when seriously injured. In this study, researchers...

1999-2000 Yi Liu, Ph.D. University of Southern California There are over 100 forms of arthritis. In many instances, patients do not fully express the symptoms of one specific form, but have an overlap of symptoms from two or more diseases. This condition of "overlap" is classified...

1999-2000 Sanshiro Hashimoto, M.D. Scripps Research Institute Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by the progressive erosion of cartilage, believed to be caused by an increased number of cartilage cells undergoing "cell death" without adequate regeneration of new cells. Dr. Hashimoto's study examined the...